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Friedland Transit Camp – Past and Present

The Friedland transit camp is just a few minutes’ walk from the Museum Friedland. Today, the camp serves as the initial reception centre for asylum seekers and Jewish immigrants in Lower Saxony, and as the national initial reception centre for ethnic German immigrants.

The site of the Friedland transit camp is home to a number of heritage buildings dating from the first days of the camp. In addition, there are also memorials to the prisoners of war released from the Soviet Union and to the role of the Friedland camp in the 1960s and 1970s.

After visiting the museum, you can also join a tour of the site of the Friedland transit camp. The tours, all offering a personal view of the camp, are led by people who entered Germany through the reception centre, residents of the small town of Friedland, or volunteers and staff in the camp.

 

Bahnhof Friedland

Bahnhof Friedland

Did you know ...

the Nissen hut was originally invented by a Canadian-American engineer during the First World War?

Friedlandglocke

Friedlandglocke

Nissenhütte

Nissenhütte

Did you know ...

the Friedland transit camp has been immortalised in a film and a song?

St. Norbert

St. Norbert

Evangelische Lagerkapelle

Evangelische Lagerkapelle

Did you know ...

two of the bells in the Friedland camp’s St. Norbert Church come from the former East Prussia and Silesia, and the sound of them ringing has been preserved on vinyl?

Did you know ...

today, the Friedland camp primarily houses refugees from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan?

Friedland Gedächtnisstätte

Friedland Gedächtnisstätte

Griff in die Freiheit

Griff in die Freiheit